CRANE LOVE PROJECT : the story and inspiration

Got inspired with some beautiful digital artworks of Aquarius Frali. His interesting style of visual story telling caught my attention.

Aquarius Frali is so lucky to have some friends that understands  his unique style and pose in front of his camera. I tried to do some with my friend but it is awkward  explaining what your digital artwork supposed to look like  to  your subject.

Well, here’s my first attempt entitled “Crane Love Project”. Thanks Abby for helping me out on this one 😀 Not Bad

This project was inspired by the story of Sadako Sasaki

According to Wikipedia, Sadako Sasaki  was a Japanese girl who was two years old when the atomic bomb was dropped on August 6, 1945, near her home by Misasa Bridge in Hiroshima, Japan. Sadako is remembered through the story of attempting to fold a thousand origami cranes before her death, and is to this day a symbol of innocent victims of war.

Sadako was at home when the explosion occurred, about one mile from Ground Zero, she was blown out of the window and her mother ran out to find a child, she suspected she may be dead but she found her two year old daughter alive. In November 1954, Sadako developed swellings on her neck and behind her ears. In January 1955, purple spots had formed on her legs. Subsequently, she was diagnosed with leukemia (her mother referred to it as “an atom bomb disease”). She was hospitalized on February 21, 1955, and given, at the most, a year to live.

Several years after the atomic bomb, an increase in leukemia was observed especially among children. By the early 1950s it was clear that the leukemia was caused by radiation exposure.

On August 3, 1955, Sadako’s best friend Chizuko Hamamoto came to the hospital to visit, and cut a golden piece of paper into a square to fold it into a paper crane, in reference to the ancient Japanese story that promises that anyone who folds a thousand origami cranes will be granted a wish by the Gods. A popular version of the story is that Sadako fell short of her goal of folding 1,000 cranes, having folded only 644 before her death, and that her friends completed the 1,000 and buried them all with her.


Though she had plenty of free time during her days in the hospital to fold the cranes, she lacked paper. She would use medicine wrappings and whatever else she could scrounge up. This included going to other patients’ rooms to ask to use the paper from their get-well presents. Chizuko would bring paper from school for Sadako to use.

During her time in the hospital her condition progressively worsened. Around mid-October her left leg became swollen and turned purple. After her family urged her to eat something, Sadako requested tea on rice and remarked “It’s good.” Those were her last words. With her family around her, Sadako died on the morning of October 25, 1955 at the age of 12.

So again, thanks Aquarius Frali for the inspiration and Abby for being patient 😀

So that’s for now guys.

So Till Then and Godbless 😀

 

 

 

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